Categories of registrants

All BPC registrants use a psychoanalytic model of the mind, that means that symptoms and everyday life difficulties are looked at in depth as to what in the sufferer is causing the problem. The terms 'psychoanalytic' and 'psychodynamic' are both used to describe psychotherapy based on psychoanalytic principles. The BPC uses them in the titles of its registrants to differentiate the way of working that they are registered as being able to do.

The BPC registers its practitioners according to the type of work they are trained to do: with adults or children, couples or groups, and at different intensities or 'frequencies' (from one session per week to four or five sessions per week). These different 'categories' of registration, which will appear on a practitioner's entry in our register, are described below. Some registrants will be registered under more than one category, depending on their training. However, all the psychotherapists and counsellors listed have the same level of registration with the BPC - there are no different 'levels', no 'higher' or 'lower' categories.

There is a Deferred type of registration which includes those qualified psychoanalytic or psychodynamic psychotherapists who are not currently registered for independent clinical practice by virtue of the fact that their work is not regulated by the BPC, but who are currently of good standing. They would otherwise be eligible to be fully registered. Deferred Registrants are bound by the BPC’s Code of Ethics, and remain subject to the BPC’s Complaints Procedure.

Practitioners may also have expertise in applications other than the one(s) of their original training(s); but all BPC therapists are governed by a code of ethics which requires that they practice within their own levels of competence. The best way to find whether a therapist might be able to help is to meet with them and see if you feel you would be able to work together.

Psychoanalysis (originating with Sigmund Freud, 1856-1939) is based on the theory that early relationships with parents, and childhood experiences of love, loss, sexuality and death all lay down patterns in the mind which have enduring effects on psychological functioning, and are the source of conflicts which can block development. Psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic or psychodynamic psychotherapy provide a setting within which these unconscious patterns can be brought into awareness, so that the patient may recognise the unconscious forces shaping his or her life and creating repetitive disturbing or empty relationships.

Analytical Psychology (Jungian Analysis) originated in the work of the Swiss psychiatrist Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961). Offering a comprehensive model of the human psyche, analytical psychology includes a psychotherapeutic approach for improving mental health and facilitating maturation of the personality as well as a theoretical body of knowledge with wide applicability to social and cultural issues.

> What is psychoanalytic/psychodynamic psychotherapy?

> What's the difference between psychoanalytic and psychodynamic psychotherapy?

Definitions of our categories of registrants

(in alphabetical order)+

Child and Family Psychodynamic Psychotherapist
Trained to work therapeutically with children, young people and families, in a variety of settings such as schools, residential social work, GP practices, CAMHS and the voluntary sector.

Couple Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist
Trained to work intensively with couples. A lot of the work is with interpretations (making the unconscious part of the mind conscious) and often uses the relationship between couple and the therapist as the focus.  The theory base is wholly psychoanalytic.

Couple Psychodynamic Psychotherapist
Trained to work with couples. Some of the work is with interpretations (making the unconscious part of the mind conscious) and uses the relationship between couple and the therapist as the focus, but there is also a focus on everyday life and outside experiences.  The theory base is psychoanalytic.

Forensic Psychodynamic Psychotherapist (previously Psychodynamic Practitioner In Mental Health and/or Forensic Settings)
Trained to work therapeutically in institutions where patients are resident, either on an individual or group basis. Most of the work is focussed on everyday life and experiences in the institution. The theory base is psychoanalytic.

Jungian Analyst (Analytical Psychologist)
Trained to work intensively (3 to 5 times weekly), often with the patient lying on the couch. Most of the work is with interpretations and uses the relationship between patient and analyst as the focus. The theory base is psychoanalytic including Jungian.

Jungian Child Analyst
As above, but working with children.

Medical Psychodynamic Psychotherapist
Doctors who are also trained to work once or twice weekly, generally with the patient/client seated on a chair. Some of the work is with interpretations (making the unconscious part of the mind conscious) and uses the relationship between patient and therapist as the focus, but there is also a focus on everyday life and outside experiences.  The theory base is psychoanalytic.

Psychoanalyst
Trained to work very intensively (4 or 5 times weekly), generally with the patient lying on the couch. Most of the work is with interpretations (making the unconscious part of the mind conscious) and uses the relationship between patient and therapist as the focus. The theory base is wholly psychoanalytic.

Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist
Trained to work intensively, generally with the patient lying on the couch. A lot of the work is with interpretations (making the unconscious part of the mind conscious) and often uses the relationship between patient and therapist as the focus. The theory base is wholly psychoanalytic.

Psychodynamic Counsellor
Trained to work once weekly, with the client seated on a chair. Some of the work is likely to be with interpretations (making the unconscious part of the mind conscious) and to use the relationship between patient and therapist as the focus, but there is also a substantial focus on everyday life and outside experiences. The theory base is psychoanalytic.

Psychodynamic Group Therapist
Trained to work in groups, generally once weekly. The theory base is psychoanalytic, including group analytic. Some of the work is with interpretations (making the unconscious part of the mind conscious) and uses the relationship between the group members and therapist as the focus, but there is also a focus on everyday life and outside experiences.

Psychodynamic Psychotherapist
Trained to work once or twice weekly, generally with the patient/client seated on a chair. Some of the work is with interpretations (making the unconscious part of the mind conscious) and uses the relationship between patient and therapist as the focus, but there is also a focus on everyday life and outside experiences. The theory base is psychoanalytic.

Psychodynamic Psychotherapist in time limited work with adolescents
Trained to work once or twice weekly, in working therapeutically and in a time limited way with adolescents. Some of the work is with interpretations (making the unconscious part of the mind conscious) and uses the relationship between patient and therapist as the focus, but there is also a focus on everyday life and outside experiences. The theory base is psychoanalytic.

Psychodynamic Psychotherapist in work with children and families
Trained to work once or twice weekly, in working therapeutically with children, young people or families. Some of the work is with interpretations (making the unconscious part of the mind conscious) and uses the relationship between patient and therapist as the focus, but there is also a focus on everyday life and outside experiences. The theory base is psychoanalytic.

Psychodynamic Therapist In Organisational Settings  and
Psychodynamic Counsellor In Organisational Settings
Trained to work therapeutically in organisations, either on an individual or group basis. Most of the work is focussed on everyday life and experiences in the institution. The theory base is psychoanalytic, including group relations.